6 easy ways to make your ui more accessible
Views: 7
0 0
Read Time:4 Minute, 33 Second

There is no doubt that digital products have revolutionized the world. In our lifetime, we have seen Internet access declared a human right.

We’re always just a few clicks away from seemingly endless information. We can do everything from paying our taxes and ordering groceries, to interacting with our governments and earning an online degree. Despite this, not all digital experiences are accessible.

Although many view people with disabilities as a small subset of their users, this is a myth. Almost one in 5 Americans has a disability. 54% of Americans with disabilities go online. Fortunately, the world is starting to recognize that the web should be designed for everyone.

An accessible website is one that is designed and coded, people with disabilities can use them. It’s important for designers to think about accessibility when working to create intuitive user interfaces and experiences.

Currently only public sector websites need to comply Web 2.0 Content Accessibility Guidelines, which maintains websites to accessibility standards similar to those set for the built environment. Next year, and for years to come, we will see pressures put on the private sector to begin to comply.

The Interaction Design Foundation explains that there are five key areas of usability to consider: visual, motor / ability, auditory, seizures, and learning. There are people from all walks of life who use your site or app who hope to find what they want as quickly and easily as anyone else.

Here are some things to make your website more accessible.

Allow users to resize pages and content

Users view your product from different screens on many different devices. We love to create experiences where users can resize content to fit their needs. Imagine this scenario: a user enters information in a control and the page automatically zooms in on the control. In this position, the user should have the option of zooming out or zooming in to ensure the action he is taking. Making this easily doable creates a seamless experience.

eGuide: How to Use Smart Data to Deliver Higher Marketing Return on Investment

2 in 3 marketers admit that data-driven decisions beat instinct. Unlock the true potential of your marketing with smart data to accelerate your business growth!

Get your free copy!

Make the search bar easy to locate and use

As we discussed in our 2019 trend presentation for the Beer meets UXA prominent, easy-to-use search bar is something big brands are taking advantage of.

A common goal of user experience is to minimize the effort required for the user to complete a task, for example by limiting the number of clicks required to enter information in a search bar. For example, on the Tidal streaming platform, clicking on the search symbol not only takes you to the search page, but it also opens the keyboard for you to type in your query.

wix campaign for agencies

Instead of two clicks – click the search icon, click the search bar – it anticipates that you want to search for information and automatically opens the keyboard.

Add alt text to each image

The benefits of alt tags go beyond SEO. Alt text makes it easy for visually impaired people to understand your images. This is especially important for images that are not purely decorative.

According to Moz, the alt text should be short. Since most screen readers cut text to around 125 characters, it is recommended that you keep it at or below this number. Instagram does securities in 2018, when they finally introduced an alt-text feature on their platform. This decision, among others, was an early signal that the accessible user interface is not a trend – it’s standard.

Use section headers

Much like a book or a street sign, digital products are meant to deliver information in a way that organizes, guides and moves the user to the next step.

Section headings, like a caption in a blog or at the top of a page, help users remember what they’re reading. In a WebAIM survey, 67% of respondents said they prefer to browse headers on the page. This result is ranked higher than using the « search » function, browsing the page links, and reading the entire page.

Use color contrast

Perhaps an overlooked element, using the right color contrast to ensure maximum readability is essential in making your user interface more accessible. There are times when you will find that your text does not have enough contrast against the background, or your text size does not complement its contrast. When you’re looking to make colors more accessible, use the following resources to know you’re doing it right. We love resources, including Kevin Gutowski’s website, Web Goal, and Contrast application.

This method takes into account those users who have difficulty finding menu items: knowing which tab they are hovering over and understanding where they are on the site. One possible solution is that when a user hovers over the menu item on a page, the screen reader reads that particular button aloud by reading the link text.

Intuitively, the user clicks on this element and is directed to the page of their choice. It is also advised to provide generous sizes for hotspots, no smaller than 44px by 44px. Menu navigation is one of the most important on any site, regardless of the use case. Similar to using alt text to include descriptions for images, link texts can help with items that relate to user navigation.

Happy
Happy
0
Sad
Sad
0
Excited
Excited
0
Sleepy
Sleepy
0
Angry
Angry
0
Surprise
Surprise
0

Average Rating

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%

Laisser un commentaire