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Developing an SEO strategy over time is a crucial way to ensure that your site is able to compete in search and meet its long-term goals. The tactics that made you successful two years ago may not work today, and your site’s needs will change as the business grows and changes.

Kerstin Reichert joined the RankUp podcast to talk about his own experiences with SEO strategy management for Tide, a corporate bank account provider that quickly went from being a start-up to its current status as an international company with hundreds of employees. Kerstin’s role at Tide gave him an ideal perspective on how to adapt a strategy to stay competitive over time.

As always, you can listen to the interview right here on this page or on any podcast player of your choice. Or, if you want to see a few key points, keep reading for the interview highlights. You can also follow us all on the podcast on Twitter, at @Frau_Reichert, @EddJTW and @BenJGarry, or find Kerstin on LinkedIn.

Kerstin overview

Ben: How did you get there in SEO today?

Kerstin: I started my career in a software company in Germany, and there I was dealing with a number of different marketing channels including paid search and organic search, but the main focus of l he business was organic and I also found that to be the most interesting part of the marketing.

I enjoyed working in SEO and decided that was what I wanted to specialize in. That was about 12 years ago, so from there I had different SEO roles internally and in agency.

Most recently I am in the UK where I am now with Tide. I’ve always liked the fast pace of agencies, but wanted to have full ownership of my channel and be a well-integrated part of the marketing team. I’ve found the perfect place at Tide, where I’m now very fast paced, but I’m still able to master all SEO and be part of the marketing team and the business in general.

Tide’s example of changing SEO requirements

Ben: Could you give us a quick overview of Tide’s SEO requirements and how they’ve changed over time?

Kerstin: When I started at Tide, we were a very small marketing team. The whole company numbered around 80 people, whereas we are now close to 700. When I started in this small team, my role was much larger. I went to trade shows and even worked on the first TV commercial.

When it comes to SEO, the start was to lay the groundwork: define the strategy and find the right tools and partners to work with, then work with our developers to make sure my SEO requirements were incorporated into everything. that we launched.

We usually still do, but the requirements have become more complex. Now it is about how we are evolving and how can we do more while becoming more efficient, because there is always more to do.

As we have grown as a business we now have this whole business finance platform that needs to be highlighted and promoted so naturally the SEO requirements and efforts have to evolve with the rest of the business.

How much of the strategy is defined and how much is experimental?

Ed: When you first joined the company, did you have a strong vision of what the strategy should be, or were you quite an experimenter in certain areas?

Kerstin: We are doing more testing now that we have the time and the basics to do so. At first it was more about building the real estate we needed to rank.

When I started, the website was very, very small. We had a product – the business account – and then a few pages that were typical startup editorial content, like team and company updates.

In the beginning it was about trying to find ways to attract the right audience. We had to develop our online real estate space, talk more about the product, create content around its functionalities and functionalities, and then speed up the production of our editorial content.

How do the technical requirements of a site change over time?

Ed: How has the technical work required for the site evolved over the years?

Kerstin: It’s still changing and getting more complex. At first, since it was a small website, we didn’t have any of the legacy issues I’ve seen on older and larger websites when it is difficult to make fixes. Working on a new website is different because you start with a clean sheet.

We were able to incorporate the features we needed so that editors and writers could know what SEO elements they need to consider in their content, like metadata, schema markup, and optimized images.

From there, as we grew, it was about how we evolved it, including the templates and structure of the website.

One of the challenges of working for a new business is that you don’t know what’s coming up. You want to make sure that your content remains visible and accessible to users and search engines, but trying to anticipate what you’re going to have is difficult.

When I started on the website, I didn’t know how many different products we would launch, I didn’t know how many partnerships we would have with other companies, and I didn’t know what kind of content we were going to produce – and now , we are also expanding internationally!

In the beginning, it was basically doing what we could to have a good setup. Now there are different requirements so the site becomes more complex and still requires constant work. We also need to be aware not only of how we are building new things, but also how we don’t make the site too heavy and slow in the process.

How to make your content stand out?

Ben: There are so many different sites out there trying to create business and finance content, so how do you make Tide stand out and actually get clicks?

Kerstin: It is a long term effort. There are many platforms out there that talk about similar things, but don’t let that put you off. I know from experience that there are still so many possibilities for you to do something really great. The situation is probably not as bad as it looks.

For us, although there are similar companies, we position ourselves as the true thought leader in small business finance. Some FinTech competitors focus on personal finance and corporate finance, but we are 100% focused on small businesses and their needs. It’s at the heart of all our content.

We also work with our partners – we have a lot of accounting partners and members who are doing some very interesting things. Some of our members are business creation experts because they have done it, so we work with them and they contribute our content.

There are topics that we already have experts on, because we are finance experts, but there are other topics that our accounting partners or our members are better placed to talk about.

We also conduct surveys of our members to better understand what they would like to read. What do they care about? Where are they fighting and do they need advice?

And it’s not just informational or educational content. We’re also working on data sources to create insight into the UK small business landscape, for example, and then tell stories about them.

And we’re always, always on the lookout for government news and announcements. We actually have dedicated people to keep up to date so that as soon as there is an announcement I can update our members, and we create content around that for our readers whether they are members or not.

Everything our readers need to know can be found on the Tide website. This makes us very relevant as a source of information for small business owners and hopefully Google will feel the same over time.

Join the conversation on the page

To hear all of the content from Kerstin’s interview, listen to the podcast episode at the top of this page or search for the RankUp SEO Podcast channel on the podcast app of your choice.

You can see more of Kerstin on LinkedIn, or see his work in action on the Tide website.

Edd and Ben will be back soon with a new episode of the RankUp podcast. In the meantime, you can find us on Twitter @BenJGarry and @EddJTW.

If you would like to be invited to the show, please contact us on Twitter or by email.

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