gevorg avetisyan mTYRfrFVDCY unsplash scaled
Views: 3
0 0
Read Time:4 Minute, 30 Second

Infographics are awesome. As a content tool, these are a useful, easy-to-digest ways to present facts, information, and statistics, and they’re super shareable too. However, the days of creating a fun infographic are long gone, and in fact it is getting just as much attention. Why? Because, well, everyone and their dog do it. The computer graphics market is saturated, making it harder to stand out. But that doesn’t mean you have to forget everything. We thought about how you can make infographics that are always useful. So when the time comes to spread information to the world, you have some practical advice.

Think about who you want to reach

kelly sikkema PMxoh8zJNb0 unsplash

Not everyone will be interested in what you have to say, and that’s fine. If you are a dog grooming business, non-pet owners will not take care of you and there is no point in trying to please everyone. What does your audience want? What in particular would be useful to them? Infographics with a clear goal and target are more likely to gain traction.

Is the information useful?

It might sound a little silly, but you should consider the value of the information you plan to present. Will your readers find it really interesting or useful? It’s a good idea to strike a good balance between providing accurate, meaningful and useful information that isn’t misleading, and voila, the ingredients for a fabulous infographic! If you want to see one that we did earlier, head over to our blog post above the line vs below the line.

Use imagery to your advantage

luke chesser JKUTrJ4vK00 unsplash

While infographics are images themselves, don’t be fooled into thinking that throwing a ton of written content on them makes them exciting and digestible. Use images to convey or save stats and include eye-catching illustrations or images to help get the general message across. Items like bar charts are useful for making comparisons, mind maps or other diagrams are great for explaining themes, and you can even add actual photos if they match your theme.

Sometimes less is more

You’ve heard the term before, and with infographics in some cases less is more. Long, complicated, and crowded infographics trying to tell you all the news in the world are hard to read, and there’s a good chance the information will go in one ear and come out the other. Let’s not overwhelm our audience. Keep it simple, clear, not too crowded and as a picture, not too long either. As for sizing advice, it’s kind of up to you (as there are many recommendations), but in general, 600px width is considered the maximum (as this will fill a blog) and length somewhere about 2,000 to 5,000 pixels. But again, it will depend on what you are trying to convey and ultimately up to you.

Make sure it is easy to see

So you put a ton of hard work into creating a focused, simple, focused, and wonderful infographic and then when it goes into the monthly newsletter or the website it’s barely readable because the font is too small or the colors are too small. don’t work on a smaller scale. These are things to consider when designing an infographic, as it’s likely that it will need to be resized for use on different platforms. Keeping it simplistic will help, but if it’s not easy to read, it will simply be ignored and forgotten.

Grab the attention of your readers with a thought-provoking headline

gabriel bassino zEawlLdVloo unsplash

Finding a good title is a talent in itself, but it is 100% achievable. A headline that kills will grab your audience’s attention and then your fabulous infographic content will keep them there. If you are not sure, ask for the opinions or thoughts of others, as they might surprise you and come up with something epic. Also, think about how your headline describes the infographic – it needs to be on topic. Also, don’t make it too long, relatively short, and eye-catching, which means viewers can scan it without much effort.

Prove that you are not inventing

If you use any statistics in your infographic, let your readers know that they are from trusted sources or are based on your own first-party data findings. Anyone can invent a statistic out of thin air to shock someone by reading their content, so just place a small section of references or quotes at the end of your infographic so that anyone who wants to share or use your content will know. that you are a trustworthy source.

Think about the way things are going

tobias carlsson d3Zu34NBg7A unsplash

It’s important to walk a reader through your infographic as smoothly as possible. Why? Because it can help keep them engaged for longer. Putting all the stats you have in an inconsistent template just to try and get a few points across will be confusing and harder to figure out, so think about what flow or story you’re trying to tell with your infographic.

What is the most important fact that you plan to include? What are you trying to tell your readers? How can you present this in a succinct and clear manner that guides them well through the information?

The numbering can be used very well as an aid to demonstrate flow, distinct sections, sub-headings, arrows, etc. Be creative and see what you can find.

Happy infographic creation!

Share this post

Happy
Happy
0
Sad
Sad
0
Excited
Excited
0
Sleepy
Sleepy
0
Angry
Angry
0
Surprise
Surprise
0

Average Rating

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%

Laisser un commentaire