echo grid kmo52azVCzg unsplash scaled
Views: 43
0 0
Read Time:7 Minute, 7 Second

One of the most effective ways to reach relevant users on the Internet is through paid search advertising. Paid search or pay-per-click (PPC) advertising is a form of search engine advertising, where you show an ad to a user when they search for a product or service that you offer. For example, imagine you are a roofing supply store, serving trade and DIY customers. When your customers Google for « roofing supplies », « roof tiles » or « roofing sheets », you can show them an ad and bring them to your website. Sounds simple, right? Well it is, but there’s a lot of work to be done before we can get to this point. We’ll walk you through the key steps to take into account when setting up your own Google Ads campaign.

Create an account

The first step is to create your PPC account. This can be done on many paid search channels, but the two main ones are Google and Bing. Google accounts for about 86% of online searches and Bing about 10%. Therefore, Google will provide the most traffic, but it is also important to consider Bing. Advertising on both channels will cover approximately 96% of all search engine searches.

It’s easy to get started on both channels, and the following links have some helpful setup guides to get you started:

Google Ads

Bing Ads

When creating your account, you will need to add your business information such as name and address. This is also a good time to add your billing information. You will need to enter the card details of the account that Google will charge. PPC campaigns are billed when a user clicks on your ad, and the price for those clicks can vary. Google also adds a 2% tax on all media spending, so be sure to factor that into your media budgets.

Now that your account is set up, the fun begins.

Keyword research

On PPC campaigns, we can choose which keywords we want to advertise for. A keyword is a word or phrase that we have in our PPC campaigns. When a user searches for this keyword on the search engine, our ad may appear. The ability to choose our keywords gives us great control over what we want to pay for. For example, returning to the roofing supply store, they can choose keywords related to the products they are selling. They can choose to advertise the “roof tiles”, but not the “ventilation” – it’s their choice.

One of the most important tasks when setting up a PPC account is to do thorough keyword research. Keyword research is the process of finding a portfolio of keywords relevant to the products or services you want to promote. In the example above, the roofing store wants to advertise the tiles. Rather than advertising on that single keyword, it is important to research other keywords that can be added as different ways of finding the same product. These can be materials such as « concrete tiles », brands such as « red tiles » or variations such as « black tiles ».

Keyword research can be done using Google Keyword Planner. It’s really important to filter out anything that is irrelevant so that we don’t spend money on those keywords. They can even be added as negative keywords to prevent us from accidentally appearing on them. It is also important to check the search volume associated with the keywords you have selected to make sure you have a good search volume. It’s also worth identifying your budget to verify that you won’t be spending your entire budget on keywords with very high search volume. It’s ideal to have a mix of smaller, more specific keywords and bigger, broader keywords if your budget allows.

Once your keyword research has been done and you are happy with your keyword list, keep them in a safe place as we will need them throughout the campaign creation process.

Create a campaign structure

A good campaign structure can lead to better performance of your campaigns. This is because budgets are allocated at the campaign level. Therefore, in order to manage them effectively, we need to divide our campaigns into themes.

The themes of your campaigns should reflect the themes of the website. This makes it really consistent and ensures that we have different product lines. Again using the roofing supplier as an example, a good structure would be to have a separate campaign for each of the following:
Roof tiles
Roofing sheets
Insulation
Ventilation
Roof windows

For building materials dealers, you could have a campaign for « Wood », another for « Cements » and another for « Fixings ». This should give you a better idea of ​​how to divide the campaigns.

The next step is to break them down further by subtopic or, in PPC terms, “Ad groups”. Ad groups contain thematic keywords and then ads relevant to those topics. We’ll get to the ads in a moment, but let’s use the « Roof Tiles » campaign for the roofing supplier as an example when creating ad groups. This step requires us to review our list of keywords and group together everything that falls under the Roof Tiles campaign. For example, in our keyword research we may have identified many keywords based on materials. It is advisable to divide them into different ad groups, for example:
Tiles – Concrete
Roof tiles – Plastic
Tiles – Clay
Tiles – Slate

Each of these ad groups will contain the relevant keywords. All concrete tile keywords will be in the concrete ad group and so on. This allows us to make the ads specific to what the user is looking for.

Create ad copy

Our keywords are well configured in a cohesive and logical structure, with ad groups for each of the keyword themes. Now is the time to create the ads. Ads are created within each of our ad groups, so it’s especially important to divide campaigns and ad groups into themes. Using the structure we created above, we can now create ads that are relevant to each of the materials, which improves the user journey.

In the « Slate » ad group, we have a list of slate related keywords. The ad can then be written with ‘slate mosaics’ in mind, leading to a landing page with all of the outdated thumbnails. This user journey will be transparent because the person who views and clicks on our ad will see a relevant ad and be redirected to a relevant landing page.

Imagine we have all of the thumbnail keywords in an ad group. A user searches for « slate tiles » and a generic tile ad appears with no mention of slate tiles. If they were to click, they would go to a generic tile landing page, and it would take longer and more clicks to find exactly what they were looking for. Not only is this frustrating for the user, but it will also lead to a lower quality score of our ads which in turn will decrease campaign performance.

The most important thing when creating ads is that we make them specific to the ad group they are in. It is also important to test, test, test. Test using different ad formats. Test using different titles – include product name, include brand name, include prices. Test different call to actions (CTA). There is no right or wrong way to write advertisements, just let the data do the talking.

But there are certain rules and policies that we have to follow. Prohibited content, style, and capitalization policies can all be found on Google Support. It’s worth familiarizing yourself with these rules before writing your ads so that you don’t waste time making changes.

Go live!

Once you’ve created your ads and changed some campaign settings (budgets, status, bids, placements, etc.), it’s time to go live. Once the campaigns are activated, check your campaigns again to see if they are generating impressions. It’s also a good idea to do some Google searches to see if your ad shows up (but don’t click on it!). If they’re not showing and generating impressions, check your keyword bid to make sure it’s high enough to get exposure. These are usually set at £ 0.01 by default, so you’ll need to increase them up to at least the first page bid estimate.

There are many other advanced features of Google Ads and many other things to add to our campaigns including audiences and ad extensions, but it gives you an idea of ​​how to set up a basic campaign.

If you have any questions or want to learn more, don’t hesitate to speak to a member of the Koozai team!

Share this post

Happy
Happy
0
Sad
Sad
0
Excited
Excited
0
Sleepy
Sleepy
0
Angry
Angry
0
Surprise
Surprise
0

Average Rating

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%

Laisser un commentaire